The National Diversity Awards 2014 Winners
Positive Role Model Awards

tunji-akintokunMohammed Zafran BEM,BCA | Age

Mohammed overcame adversity by channelling energy into helping others often by self-funding projects. After suffering great tragedy and loss, Mohammed engaged with youths who were involved in gang culture, and told his story. A lot of them were involved in drugs and crime but soon Mohammed got them involved in sporting activities and community set up programmes. From 30-40 youths participating in a Community Football League, Mohammed now has thousands of youths participating in his projects. He is a driven individual who has inspired many young people to gain access to education and employment, helping over 1500 youths get back in education and over 800 in employment. He has a strong profile as a leader in the local community and has introduced many activities. With 7,000 youths registered on his books, Mohammed is described as ‘A Living Legend’. Last year in May 2013, Mohammed set up his own company called All 4 Youth & Community CIC, to continue his work into the wider community.


Sarah Chapman | Disability

After leaving school with no qualifications and undiagnosed dyslexia, Sarah had low self esteem and no confidence. She turned her life around when she became pregnant with her daughter in 2009, and has miraculously not only made it to university but is a first class student with most of her modules achieving above 90%. She is Student Rep for her program SEND Pathway degree and also has a string of additional qualifications which she has gained alongside her degree, whilst volunteering firstly in a primary school as a literacy volunteer, but more recently with the Dyslexia Association. She has dedicated her time and efforts to improving the lives of people with dyslexia and organised a dyslexia event which drew 400 people from across the UK from all sectors of society. It attracted a lot of media attention and requests for articles inc: SEN Magazine, Rail professional magazines, newspapers & several radio stations. Sarah changed her life and has changed others in quite a remarkable way.


Karen Ingala Smith | Gender

Karen Ingala Smith has spent the last 24 years working with women who have experienced domestic and sexual violence. Her public speaking focuses on women from marginalised groups, she has spoken out about violence against women at the Million Women Rise March 2014 and the first world conference of women’s refugees in 2008. Since January 2012, this inspiring role model has been recording and commemorating UK women killed through suspected male violence in a campaign called 'Counting Dead Women'. This powerful piece of work helps to raise awareness of the scale of the issue. 17,000 people have signed Karen's petition to support her campaign to persuade the government to do more to end fatal male violence against women. Through Karen's organisation, nia, over 431 women over the past year have been supported through her Independent Domestic Violence Advocacy service. Karen’s work has made a true difference in thousands of women’s lives.


Aderonke Apata | LGBT

Aderonke is a feminist and human rights activist. After fleeing torture and the threat of death for being lesbian in Nigeria, she has proved to be an unstoppable force in fighting for justice. Aderonke has garnered almost 32,000 signatures online for her personal campaign to remain in the UK because she is a lesbian from Nigeria who is open, out and proud. Setting an example through this struggle fighting for her own freedom to stay here in the UK, she fights tirelessly for other people's freedom too, and continues to challenge the government and legal system that penalises the many LGBT refugees seeking asylum in the UK. Despite suffering several set-backs at the hands of the UK immigration system while at the Yarl's Wood detention centre, she rallied the other women to act as a collective force in challenging the authorities on sexual abuse at the centre. Aderonke's strength continues to challenge racism, xenophobia, lesbophobia and sexism.


Sonia Meggie | Race, Faith & Religion

Sonia Meggie, founder of Inspirational YOU, a London based social enterprise launched in March 2010. Their mission is to connect, inspire and empower young people, women and black and asian professionals. Sonia is a mother, entrepreneur, diversity consultant, mentor and football coach. She is driven by making a difference and seeing those around her reaching their full potential. Her objective is to leave a legacy that will see the progression of women, black and asian professionals and young people. With Inspirational YOU, Sonia has been networking and connecting with senior leaders who all participate in their programs and events, debates, conferences, shows and training. They are focused on enterprise, self-development and well-being workshops. Sonia has been featured in the Powerlist 2013, which profiles the most influential people of African and African Caribbean heritage in the United Kingdom, and listed on Blackenterprise.com as one of London’s most powerful black women.


Entrepreneur of Excellence Award

Rioch Edwards-Brown | So You Wanna Be In TV?

Rioch Edwards-Brown, a mother of 4, set up ‘So You Wanna Be In TV?’ after her son was shot and stabbed while in school. So You Wanna Be In TV? is an award winning social enterprise set up for at risk, financially disadvantaged and diverse youth in London interested in a career in TV. So You Wanna Be In TV? address’ youth unemployment and the lack of diversity in TV through a unique partnership with TV, Brands and corporates. They do this by providing access to high-quality free employability skills, work experience, long-term mentoring and direct access to the industry at their events. Rioch's unique sponsorship model has resulted in 1025 young people receiving free employability skills in 2011, 65% of those mentored entered TV, 17 of London's poorest borough’s have benefitted, and £300,000 worth of sponsorship has been raised. Based on her successful TV model, Rioch will be offering consultancy to corporates and companies on how to engage and recruit diversity.


Diverse Company Award

Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

Sussex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust was established in 2008 and is represented by 5,000 passionate and dedicated clinicians and support staff, working hand in hand with partners in the community to care for and support vulnerable people. Together, they provide mental health, learning disability, substance misuse and prison healthcare throughout Sussex, along with a range of specialist services across the South East of England and beyond. They serve a population of over 4 million people in Hampshire, West Sussex, Brighton and Hove, East Sussex, Kent and Medway, which makes them the most significant provider of these services nationally. Over the last few years, the Equality and Diversity Team have championed diversity, creating innovative business strategies and continuing to honour diversity staff networks across the board. The in depth evidence accumulated showcased the great commitment the trust has to ensure both equality and fairness are adopted in employment and service delivery.


Community Organisation Awards

Allsorts Youth Project | Age

Founded in 1999, Brighton based organisation Allsorts Youth Project provide youth volunteering opportunities to LGBT young people, which includes peer education in schools and colleges. The project engages in community development work with young LGBT, BME and disabled people to connect using digital and social media. Through media, events, conferences and celebrations, Allsorts create a positive image of LGBT young people, challenging stereotypes and providing inspiring role models. Allsorts also provide a weekly Drop-In service, teen to adult personal advisor sessions, LGBT Youth Awareness workshops and one to one support for LGBTU young people. Allsorts run endless campaigns and initiatives, including 'The Big Push’ for World Mental Health Day, ‘End LGBT Bullying’, and a viral campaign ‘Global Voices’ for International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia with a series of images of the young people saying what their school could have done better.


Shabang!| Disability

An amazing theatre group run by Kim Reuter and Russ Elias. A huge set of nominations and some stunning evidence demonstrate why Shabang Theatre is so popular amongst its supporters. Shabang is part of a triad of arts organisations who came together to realise the renovation of The Watershed in Slaithwaite. Providing a fully accessible platform for performing arts, Shabang provide performance space, workshops and training for disabled people across the age range. In the words of one of their nominators, 'Put quite simply, they are brilliant. They have been a huge help both to our two year old daughter, who has Down's syndrome, and to us as parents. Shabang Theatre is utterly devoted to enhancing and supporting the development of those with additional needs through their range of creative and fun learning activities. They have played a critical role in helping our daughter reach key cognitive development milestones and ensuring that we, as parents, have a positive outlook on her future.'


Working With Men | Gender

Working with Men exists so all boys and men can be productive and active members of society, and that organisations work in ways that include and support boys and men, particularly those who are socially or economically disadvantaged or excluded. The specialist charity has expertise in the difficulties boys and men from disadvantaged and marginalised backgrounds may face. They deliver a range of services including father development services, crisis support, conflict and transition services, employment and training initiatives. Working with men produce games, DVDs and training as well as obtaining power to influence policy. Examples of projects include the Uncut Project, addressing knife crime which engaged with over 2,500 people, with 91% saying it had a positive impact on their attitude and behaviour. This was supported by a marked rise in attainment levels. In 2014 they have worked with over 3000 young parents, 72% from a BME background and 12% under 18.


London Friend | LGBT

Established in 1972, London Friend is the UK’s oldest LGBT charity dedicated to the health and mental well-being of the LGBT community in and around London and the South East. These unsung heroes and heroines offer support around issues such as same-sex relationships, sexual and gender identity and promoting personal growth. All the services are delivered by a handful of paid staff on a tiny budget and a colossal of 101 trained LGBTQ un-paid volunteers. Over 44 years they have tackled one of the most destructive issues that the gay community now faces: drug and alcohol addiction. In the last year alone, 16 support groups ran each month, with 1374 attendees, 124 people completed a course of counselling and 236 people completed a course of keywork around their substance misuse. London Friend provided drug & alcohol information to 2,244 individuals and 91 training sessions to 838 professionals. Their ground-breaking work has been linked to several high profile stories in the mainstream press.


African Caribbean Leukaemia Trust | Race, Faith & Religion

ACLT was co-founded by Beverley De-Gale OBE and Orin Lewis OBE in 1996, after they received the devastating news their 6 year old son Daniel De-Gale, had been diagnosed with leukaemia. Daniel’s donor for a bone Marrow transplant could only be found from the black or mixed race population of which 550 were registered. He touched the hearts of the nation as he overcame the incredible odds of 1 in 250,000 to become the first black individual in the UK to receive a bone marrow transplant from an unrelated donor after three years of campaigning. ACLT continue with their life saving work of spreading awareness with the sole purpose to increase the number of ethnic minorities registered on the bone marrow, blood and organ registers. Over 17 years, the ACLT have increased the number of African, Caribbean and mixed race potential donors on the UK bone marrow lists from approx. 550 to approx. 50, 000, and have helped save the lives of over 50 individuals through their bone marrow registrations drives.


Give ‘em Hope Campaign | Multi-Strand

The Give 'em Hope Campaign is an inclusive and inspirational celebration of diversity; an online initiative to encourage and uplift those who feel marginalised, isolated or limited by labels. They exist to bring hope to those who need it most and do so by sharing their stories. The campaign has grown significantly, with the support of numerous international cheerleaders and proactive participants. The Give ‘em Hope Campaign aims to eradicate limiting labels in society by acknowledging our similarities, whilst celebrating our differences. It is not an overstatement to say that the impact of this quiet campaign has been significant. Young men and women have spoken of overcoming their isolation and feelings of worthlessness; their improved self-image and new-found ability to recognise self-destructive behaviours and prevent these from continuing. One nominator said 'Everybody needs hope for whatever reason. The Give ‘em hope campaign does just that'.


Lifetime Achiever Award

Dilys Price OBE

Dilys Price OBE; B.Ed (Hons); M.Ed, Hon Fellow Cardiff Metropolitan University (CMU). It is difficult to fit so many achievements into one paragraph but during Dilys' 82 years, her commitment, passion and true dedication has improved the lives of many. Dilys has been a very influential force in integrating inclusion into society and the respect for children and adults with special needs since the 1970s. Director of Touch Trust, Dilys set up the charity for children and adults with the most profound disabilities. Dilys pioneered the first British Adapted Physical Education Course and trained teachers in the UK/USA, is a founding member of the Wales Sports Association for Special Needs and a consultant for Movement Activities for a variety of special needs groups. Dilys developed the British Gymnastic Awards Levels and secured the Trampolining Award for special needs. A well known sky diver, Dilys regularly raises money to expand The Touch Trust's work. In 2002, Dilys was awarded an OBE for Services to the Disabled.